Posts Tagged ‘Tim Tebow’

Shaking a Fist at God While Rooting Against Tim Tebow

Saturday, January 14th, 2012

Why Do They Mock Him?

I listen to leftists talk about Tim Tebow as if he is evidence that conservative Christians are mad. It’s not that Tebow himself makes a grand spectacle of his praying, but that others focus on it by bringing it to the attention of the world.  Leftists in particular hate all of this “prayer stuff,” and while they have no problem with Muslims facing Mecca in their regular daily submission before Allah, or a band of Wiccans dancing in the moonlight in their own form of spiritual celebration,  they recoil in horror at the sight of a man, one plain, Christian man, knelt in humble supplication before his God.  I’m not a fan of football, but I hope Tebow prevails, not because one should assume his winning or losing may indicate anything about God’s will, but because I’ve had more than enough of people of faith being mocked for merely being faithful.

Of course, the problem is that some of the Tebow-haters are just sports fans rooting for his opponents, but what I’ve discovered in pop-culture is that more often than not, those who cheer for Tebow’s opponents do so out of a rage against judgment.  It’s their form of shaking a fist at the heavens, and I’ve heard and read their comments enough to know that their jeers aren’t born of much else but a sort of seething rage against any expression of faith, but no such expression brings their rage to the surface like an American Christian who will not hide his or her faith for the comfort of these nagging ne’er-do-wells.

If they don’t share Tebow’s faith, you might well wonder, why must they rage against it?  Every time Tim Tebow takes a knee in prayer, these insecure people take it as an assault on the sincerity of the faith they claim but to which they have no strong attachment, or more often, no willingness to voice in public.  In effect, in their own minds, but not in Tebow’s, his silent prayer is a slap at their unwillingness to do so for whatever reason, be it a lack of humility or sincerity, or faith altogether.

These are the same people who cry out in shrill tone at the first hint of “judgment.”  Let me suggest to you that there is ample reason for their cries, but notice what judgment they fear most: It is the estimation of their own lives and actions that they wish to avoid.  This is a symptom of how insecure they feel about the nature of the lives they lead, and what they wish to avoid most of all is any reminder that all things are to be judged in one way or another, now and in the future.

When they mock Tebow, what they are mocking is not even God, or religion, or faith.  They will mock Tim Tebow, but they do so out of a fear and loathing.  What they angrily demonstrate is their fearful desire for a different form of absolution, through which even their fellow men might not judge them.  They seek an escape not from God’s law, but from the notion that there is any morality at all, and when they see the striking figure of a kneeling Tim Tebow, out in the open upon a field in plain view of the entire world, they are treated to a reminder that their days of avoiding judgment must inevitably end, and that such a judgment begins first in one’s own heart and mind.  At this stark realization, they shake their fists in rebellion, to no avail.

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Sarah Palin Discusses GOP Field

Sunday, December 18th, 2011

Weighing Our Options

In a telephone interview with Shannon Bream on FNC today discussed the GOP candidates, and Tim Tebow.  She said she’s “just not there yet” with respect to the GOP field, and wants to withhold any endorsement until she can sincerely make one.  Bream asked what is to many conservatives and Tea Party folk the million dollar question:  “Does that person does exist in the field as it now stands?” Palin replied “We’ll see, I honestly don’t know yet.”  She mentioned that she believed Bachmann and Santorum would likely do better “than some RINO pundits predict.”

It seems that the former Alaska governor is taking her time and has yet to draw a firm conclusion about the field, but I suspect it will be comforting to many conservatives and Tea Party folk that at this late date, Sarah Palin shares in their lack of clarity about who to support.  She also made a very important point about candidates promising reform now, but who have to one degree or another failed to deliver such reforms when they had those opportunities in office, whether in Congress, or in state governments. Palin mentioned the desire to feel enthusiasm for a candidate, and she described what many conservatives feel about this race.  She also downplayed the value of endorsements in general, and pointed out that independent-minded Americans don’t necessarily weigh endorsements of others very heavily.